Super Simple Vegan Spinach Burgers

If you’ve ever had cravings for a good vegan burger you have probably noticed that shop bought ones can get pretty pricey, and many recipes can get quite complicated (with seitan, tofu etc.). This recipe for vegan spinach burgers is great because it is super simple, cheap to make, and the end product is mega tasty and healthy.

I picked this recipe up from a friend I was visiting last week in Asturias, Northern Spain, which was a huge treat since the culture in that area is very heavily centred around meat. A few years ago I would have been hard pushed to find anyone who even knew what a vegan was, but today there is an increased awareness and even the odd vegan restaurant (like Beware of the Cat) but there is still a long way to go!. Anyway, on to the recipe:

(I won’t include all the bells and whistles for the sake of simplicity, but I will add some suggestions at the end to spice things up a bit) *I’ve just realised that these are also gluten free if wheat flour isn’t used, bonus*

Ingredients

  • 1 medium size onion, minced
  • 3 cup packed spinach leaves
  • 1 cup chickpeas, it’s up to you whether you want to mash them
  • 1/2 cup chickpea flour (ordinary wheat flour could probably be used instead)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, crushed (or chopped finely)

Method

Cook the onion in a pan over a medium heat with oil or a little water until softened, then add the garlic for another minute or two. Add the spinach and cook until softened, then add the chickpeas. Allow as much liquid to cook off as possible then place the mixture into a mixing bowl, now is the time to add any seasonings and mix them in thoroughly. Mix in the chickpea flour, then leave it to cool (placing it in the fridge is a shortcut). Once the mixture is cooled, you can use your hands to form the burgers (a little thick is the best to make them less likely to fall apart). Pan fry the burgers in a dash of oil over a medium heat until they are slightly browned and serve either in buns (check store bought burger buns for palm oil!) or with salad. Viola, Vegan spinach burgers!

(You could probably bake these burgers instead and get similar results, but I haven’t tried that so who knows!)

Extras

Like I said, the above recipe is for the simple, no frills spinach burgers but if you want to make them even more exciting, you can add almost anything, that’s the beauty of these burgers; they’re tasty enough on their own but neutral enough to fit with most spices. I’ve had them with a teaspoon of cumin, some with coriander, even adding a little soy sauce can add a splash of flavour to the mix. Be creative but remember to not over-spice!

If you try this recipe and make some vegan spinach burgers then leave a comment and let me know how it turned out! Don’t forget to share this page and subscribe to the website to receive updates for new content, you can also follow the Fox Eyed Man on Twitter, Facebook, Google+Tumblr and now Instagram for further discussions about environmentalism.

Featured Image: ‘Spinach‘ by Daniella Segura is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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Meat Free Monday: A Curse in Disguise?

The idea of ‘Meat Free Monday’ has become increasingly popular recently, and many people are praising the progress being made in the name of animal welfare and environmental sustainability. If you are not familiar with the concept, people are encouraged to not consume meat products on Mondays in an effort to improve health, save money and reduce environmental impact. Many argue that this can only be positive, it is a step towards the eventual transition to a completely plant based diet that is needed to avoid environmental collapse. However, as usual it is our duty to look deeper and examine the latent implications in order to fully understand the situation. Meat Free Monday may indeed be more of a curse than a blessing.

  • Meat Free Monday encourages complacency. Instead of properly tackling the ethical, environmental and health issues that surround animal products, people may feel as though they are doing enough by just avoiding meat for one day. By championing the herculean efforts needed to not eat meat for just one day, people remain unaware that their effort is minuscule compared to the good they could be doing by going all the way. Also, it detracts from further efforts to encourage change: If people are already satisfied that they are ‘doing enough’ they are far less likely to make further efforts. The importance of the plant based movement is diminished by praising the only partial recognition of environmental issues, animal lives and personal health, so Meat Free Monday could be actively damaging the vegan message.
  • There is not enough emphasis on educationThis is always a driving point to my arguments, education is essential for almost every aspect of progress, whether it be environmental protection, animal rights or anything else. The problem with Meat Free Monday is that not nearly enough emphasis is placed on actually educating people as to why animal products are harmful. Without really knowing why they are participating the whole purpose of the activity is lost and people are left assuming ‘it’s something to do with health’ or ‘I think I’m saving the environment’. The only way to really stress the importance of the plant based movement is by making sure that people are educated about the issues that need addressing. However, armed with the knowledge about the harmful nature of animal product industries, Meat Free Mondays would seem pointless and nothing short of complete veganism would be logical.
  • Dairy and eggs are not included. By placing the importance on meat, the egg and dairy industries are ignored and reduced in importance. Physical meat becomes the symbolic representation of animal products and makes people blind to the total saturation of animal products in our everyday lives. If the activity was to avoid all animal products for one day, people would realise how damaging animal products are sneaked into a ludicrous percentage of everyday items. The dairy and egg industries are extremely damaging and unethical (read more about the culling of day old male chicks here) and it seems illogical to leave them out of the picture.

There may be more points, but these are the blaringly obvious points that come to mind immediately. I’m interested to see what your ideas are on the subject, do you support the Meat Free Monday campaign, or do you think it is actually damaging? Leave a comment below and let me know what you think!

Don’t forget to share this page and subscribe to the website to receive updates for new content, you can also follow the Fox Eyed Man on Twitter, Facebook, Google+Tumblr and now Instagram for further discussions about environmentalism.

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emissions carbon footprint travel Iceland stupid ecological facts ethics wtf animal agriculture top 10 winter raw problematic ovo-sexing ethical victory loss grinder industry geothermal culling male chicks eggs money nature anime studio manga ghibli miyazaki rights animal rights future animal funny government change plant based free meat suffering environmental sustainability education food health veganism environment vegan