Aggressive Veganism?

How much is too much? The aggressive approach taken by many vegans and animal rights (AR) activists is a subject of debate for a while now within the movement. When I say aggressive I mean the level of intensity that some employ for their methods of spreading the vegan or AR message, from sharing graphic images, swearing profusely or actively criticising others. This doesn’t only mean being harsh it could also include focusing your efforts into a more relentless and forceful style of interacting with others. With this in mind I’d like to find out how many people take each side of the argument through a simple poll (below) to find out more about how our movement works. First I guess I should outline some of the basic ins and outs of each approach (which will of course not be exhaustive, just very basic ideas):

Aggressive Approach:

Pros:

  • It’s very easy to channel your passion and frustration into a more forceful way of dealing with others and most other vegans will identify with the things you are saying.
  • Properly calling someone out for their ignorance or stupidity in an argument can seriously limit their credibility to an audience.
  • A constant looming presence could influence people to make a change (this could be for guilt reasons etc.)
  • Animal lives are on the line so anything short of aggressiveness is not doing the issue justice.

Cons:

  • Many people may consider it off-putting, even other vegans and activists, which could damage the vegan image.
  • You can risk alienating people or shutting off a potential audience (such as the issue of swearing around children).

Laid-back Approach:

Pros:

  • Fostering a community that is understanding and encouraging is helpful for existing vegans and prospective vegan alike.
  • An easy going attitude is approachable and won’t put off/scare away potentially interested people.
  • Lots of positive content could encourage people to try veganism or influence them to make a change.
  • Trying to engage in discussions instead of arguments can encourage people to be open minded instead of assuming a defensive position.

Cons:

  • It can be hard to remain calm and level headed when witnessing the horrors and injustices inflicted upon other animals, and when met with ignorance or mockery it can be disheartening.
  • Some may say you aren’t doing enough or aren’t passionate enough about the cause.

So now you’ve seen a few basic pros and cons from each approach, and you’ve most likely encountered both sides at some point so have a sense of how they work. Now I’d like you to choose which you think is the best approach and vote in the poll below (anonymously) so we can see which is the most prominent side. Please try and get as many people as you can to take part in this poll so the results will be more accurate (share it on Facebook or Twitter or whatever).

*I haven’t added a middle ground “bit of both” option because it would skew the results, it may be a difficult decision but for the purpose of this study only the two options are available.*

What is the Best Approach, Aggressive or Laid-back?

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Thanks for voting, don’t forget to share this poll, we need as many people as possible to vote to make the results accurate! You can also follow me on Twitter or like my page on Facebook for more content.

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9 Documentaries That Could Turn Anyone Vegan

Recently there have been more and more films and documentaries that focus on the environment, animal rights and veganism. This is fantastic because documentaries and films have such strong impressions on people that they can really drive change, so make sure you share them with friends and family for maximum impact.

This post will list some of the most effective and popular films and documentaries so you don’t end up scrolling through Netflix for hours on end unable to decide what to watch. I will try to add both the popular films for people who are completely new to these ideas, and some more obscure but interesting pieces for existing environmentalists that are looking for more. As usual I won’t list them in any particular order:

Image credit goes to Cowspiracy.com

One of the most well known documentaries about the effects of animal agriculture on the environment, this film, directed and produced by Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn, is charged with facts and logic that people have a very hard time arguing against. Leonardo DiCaprio became executive producer for a new cut version released to Netflix in 2015, and since its creation it has become something of a symbol for vegans around the world.

The good thing about this documentary is the way in which it lays out all the facts in an easy to understand and thought provoking way (even though the figures are astounding). It focuses on the environmental impact of animal agriculture, but doesn’t ignore the ethical and health factors, and doesn’t rely on shocking or horrific imagery so it can be watched by anyone.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit cowspiracy.com for more information.

Image credit goes to peaceablekingdomfilm.org

This is an award winning documentary that tells the story of several traditional farmers who re-examine their relationships with animals. In doing so, their consciences show them that the only way to live is by going vegan. After realising their mistakes they set up sanctuaries for farm animals, it’s a truly touching story.

There is a newer version title, Peaceable Kingdom: The Journey Home  created by the same producer (James LaVeck) and director (Jenny Stein) in 2009 with a different star cast.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit peaceablekingdomfilm.org for more information.

Image credit goes to letlivefilm.com

A wonderful documentary directed by Marc Pierschel that explores the ethical, environmental and health reasons for adopting a vegan lifestyle. Six different individuals are interviewed about their vow to remain vegan for life including a vegan chef who used to be a butcher, and a farm sanctuary owner who used to be a factory farmer.

‘Live and Let Live’ shows how veganism has evolved from its origins in 1944 London to one of the fastest growing movements worldwide, with increasing numbers of people realising what’s on their plates matters to animals, the environment and ultimately themselves.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit letlivefilm.com for more information.

Image credit goes to forksoverknives.com

‘Forks Over Knives’ is a documentary that focuses on the health aspect of modern diets; the damage caused by animal products and the benefits of plant-based diets. Solid correlations are made between animal products and degenerative diseases that are so problematic (especially in the west) today, all of which is presented and backed by strong scientific and medical evidence.

The major story line in the film traces the personal journeys of a pair of pioneering yet under-appreciated researchers, Dr. T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn. The filmmakers also document several real patients suffering from chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, and reveal how plant based diets help them to recover.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit forksoverknives.com for more information.

 

Image credit goes to getvegucated.com

A socio-comical documentary, ‘Vegucated’ follows three meat and cheese loving New Yorkers who agree to go vegan for six weeks. This journey starts as a method of weight loss, but they soon start to uncover the dark truth of animal agriculture, and turns them against the industry they had so recently patronised.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit getvegucated.com for more information.

Image credit goes to mayibefrankmovie.com

‘May I Be Frank’ is a documentary about the moving story of an unhealthy and overweight, middle-aged, Italian-American man who discovers that a plant-based diet can help him feel and look better after he visits the vegan restaurant ‘Café Gratitude’ in Berkeley, California. The Café Gratitude employees suggest an experiment, which he accepts and undergoes a life-changing transformation that you don’t want to miss.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit mayibefrankmovie.com for more information.

Image credit goes to nationearth.com

‘Earthlings’ is one of the most talked about documentaries around, and for good reason. Directed by Shaun Monson, music by Moby and (the English version) narrated by actor Joaquin Phoenix, this film pulls no punches, and has been responsible for an awful lot of change. Not for the faint hearted, earthlings reveals the truth about the horrific way we treat animals without omitting the actual evidence, so many people have a hard time watching it (although if you can’t watch it, then you need to reconsider your consumption of animal products!).

The documentary is split into five parts that deal with different aspects of animal exploitation: pets, food, clothing, entertainment and scientific research. The use of hidden cameras reveals the true horrors that occur on a daily basis and provide a very real, and very disturbing picture of the way humans treat fellow earthlings.

The sequel to ‘Earthlings’ is called ‘Unity’ and was released in 2015, but also look out for the third part ‘Beings’ which will arrive in 2020.

Here is the trailer (WARNING This trailer contains disturbing material):

Don’t forget to visit nationearth.com for more information

Image credit goes to theghostsinourmachine.com

Photographer Jo-Anne McArthur challenges our view of animals as food and clothing as well as animal-tested goods and animal entertainment in this award winning documentary. Throughout the film Jo-Anne photographs animals on fur farms and at Farm Sanctuary, among other places, and seeks to publish her work. One of the core messages of this film is to re-evaluate how we look at animals; to start looking at animals as individuals instead of objects. The film as a whole is a plea for animal rights.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit theghostsinourmachine.com for more information.

Image credit goes to speciesismthemovie.com

Director Mark Devries sets out to investigate the world of of factory farms and reveal their secrets, as well as exploring the idea of speciesism, which is essentially the way humans assume superiority over other animals. Sometimes funny, sometimes frightening, this documentary sets out to make you rethink the way in which we treat animals and why we feel so high and mighty in an attempt to dispel the illusion of human superiority and look at animals in a new light.

Here is the trailer:

Don’t forget to visit speciesismthemovie.com for more information.

Thank you for reading this list, I hope you found something new to watch and share! With that in mind please remember that sharing these documentaries is just as important as watching them, it is essential that the information and ideas they express is distributed so that people will start seeing the truth. Animal lives, the environment and even your personal health are affected by the exploitation of animals, but people simply do not know enough to change. Going vegan is the only way we can ensure our planet avoids destruction, the only way to avoid unimaginable suffering on an unprecedented scale and the only way we can progress as an ethical, intelligent species.

Please like and share this list to help your friends and followers discover new documentaries, and consider following me on Twitter and Google+, and liking my page on Facebook, thank you.

Image Credit:
Cowspiracy – Visit cowspiracy.com for more
Peaceable Kingdom – Visit peaceablekingdomfilm.org for more
Live and Let Live (featured image) – Visit letlivefilm.com for more
Forks Over Knives – Visit forksoverknives.com for more
Vegucated – Visit getvegucated.com for more
May I Be Frank – Visit mayibefrankmovie.com for more
Earthlings – Visit nationearth.com for more
The Ghosts in Our Machine – Visit theghostsinourmachine.com for more
Speciesism: The Movie – Visit speciesismthemovie.com for more

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Political Veganism

As the vegan movement grows it is important that we do not lose sight of what is truly important and realise the potential of political veganism. We cannot allow ourselves to become dazzled by diet book celebrities and wonder workouts or we risk representing veganism as just another edgy trend. We must instead focus on the ways in which veganism can be promoted as the only way to achieve a sustainable future, and this should be done by making environmental benefits and emotional intelligence the forefront of the movement.

With this in mind, a crucial aspect of the vegan movement is in fact to understand its role as a political power. We may not at first realise how veganism fits in with politics, however the more experience we gain as vegans, the more we can see how its core values may be applied to change the face of political landscapes across the globe.

Firstly we must come to terms with what exactly the vegan movement as a whole stands for in terms of politically attributable characteristics:

  • A call for serious societal change:

When we fight in the name of veganism, we are voicing our concerns for the way the world has been configured. The social and political constructions that have dictated thought and behaviour for so long are outdated, and we are calling for serious change. As education and access to information becomes ever more readily available we are becoming far more aware of the inner workings of our world, and so far we aren’t happy with what we have seen. By fighting as vegan activists we are becoming the change we want to see in the world, and we should be educating others as to why this change is the best course of action. Put simply, we are expressing why we aren’t happy with the way the world works and as the movement grows more and more people take notice, and thus our political strength grows.

  • An extremely powerful tool for achieving environmental sustainability:

As we all know, being vegan is considered the most sustainable way to live. However, many people don’t realise the impact this information can have on influencing environmental change. From personal experience I have found that the most effective way to promote veganism is to exploit the selfishness of others by putting them face to face with the environmental destruction they are supporting. By showing them that they are actively jeopardising their way of life, many people are visibly shaken by the news. (If you need some more information as to how veganism is essential from an environmentalist perspective check out my video)

  • Opposing the industrialisation of living beings:

For me the importance soon shifted from a simple opposition to meat onto the depreciation of living beings into coldly calculated units of somatic value. The treatment of non-human animals as stock is deeply disturbing and a worrying reflection of the human attitude towards life in general. If the lives of other species are so undervalued, there is no wonder that humans continue to harm and kill each other. I’m not suggesting that if the world went vegan there would be no more wars (the human race is far too stupid to achieve world peace, come on Homo sapiens prove me wrong!), but it would be naive to think that it wouldn’t make people appreciate the lives of others. Not to mention the fact that the physical industrialisation of the animal product industry is completely unnatural even from an agricultural perspective.

  • Taking charge as consumers:

The power to change the global market rests with the consumers, but many people don’t realise just how much influence they can have by promoting or avoiding certain products or companies. Vegans boycott one of the, if not the, most destructive industries on the planet and have had a surprisingly large impact which shows that we do indeed hold the power; if we don’t buy their products, they will stop selling them.

  • The link between personal health and national budgets:

As scientific research increasingly suggests; animal products can cause a multitude of health issues. So by letting people know that living healthily as a vegan is not only achievable but actually preferable, we can actually push for positive change on a medical level. It’s no secret that health organisations around the world are under serious strain, but I believe that veganism could help relieve some of that strain. This inhabits an interesting area on the political landscape, as there could be friction between the interests of public health and the profits of pharmaceutical companies (but I’m not here to talk about medical conspiracies!).

  • The importance of emotional intelligence:

This may seem a little more abstract than the previous points, but I think it is important nonetheless. It’s no surprise to hear that the future is progressive, and one of the desirable characteristics we need to pursue this future is strong emotional intelligence. This becomes increasingly important when we consider the intersectionality between veganism and other progressive ideologies such as feminism, LGBTQ rights and disability rights movements.

So What Does This Mean?

The vegan movement needs to use these points to its advantage to establish itself firmly on the international stage as a strong and growing force. By promoting the areas that appeal most to the general populace on a political and social level, we can reinforce the positive and desirable representation of veganism.

The issue at the moment is that the vegan movement is suffering an identity crisis caused by deep internal conflicts, which quite frankly are not helping at all. One side is fighting for animals and the environment and the other for self improvement and bodily enhancements, the latter of which is unfortunately the more widely represented as the face of the vegan movement. Now I’m not saying that self improvements and diets etc. are a bad thing, they do get people’s attention, but they shouldn’t be the driving force of the movement because they lack depth. Diets and workout plans may be eye catching  but they rarely lead to long term commitments and change, so using them to represent the vegan movement is hardly a smart move. The vegan movement needs to secure its identity by rearranging priorities to put forward its core values of ethical living and environmental sustainability.

The next step would be to make sure veganism is being promoted in the most effective way, this means applying more pressure through bottom up approaches as well producing vegans with training to push for top down changes through the likes of scientific studies and political activism. By tackling both the general populace and institutions simultaneously we can ensure the effective promotion of veganism as a popular and endorsed ideology.

These are just a few ideas that I have had on the subject and there is plenty of room to expand these thoughts, so if you have any ideas please feel free to share them below and tell me what you think of the idea of political veganism.

Don’t forget to share this page and subscribe to the website to receive updates for new content, you can also follow the Fox Eyed Man on Twitter, Facebook, Google+Tumblr and now Instagram for further discussions.

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Youtube Tried to Silence Us

Hey everybody, I don’t know whether you have been following the dramas surrounding the popular vegan Youtuber scene at the moment, if not then don’t bother it’s just a load of infighting between the likes of Freelee and Durianrider etc. If you have, then I need you to avert your attention anyway. Many of you probably know of the vegan activist Bite Size Vegan (Emily Moran Barwick), but amidst all the dramas on Youtube you may not have noticed that a very influential and popular video of hers was censored by Youtube.

This may not seem like a big deal since videos get taken down all the time for this or that reason, however this action by Youtube actually went against their own policies. The video itself is a fantastic speech given by Emily that highlights the issue around animal agriculture from ethical, environmental and health perspectives that are all backed by proper research and citation (personally I found the video to be as effective, if not more effective than the likes of Cowspiracy). Youtube censored the video by only allowing logged in, age restricted viewers to see the video, which could only be reached through links.

They stated that footage from the video was in violation of their policies because it showed violence, killing and gore. However, within their own policies they clearly state that exceptions are made for educational purposes. Let me just state that this was a speech given to a group, an actual educational presentation, yet it was not considered educational. Youtube found it necessary to remove this ‘non-educational’ material from their listings, yet many, many accounts that film and document the live hunting or killing of animals are still available for unrestricted public viewing.

They tried to silence us by stopping educational material that needs to be seen, material that has to be seen for people to understand what is at stake. For this reason, the video was uploaded again onto the Bite Size Vegan Youtube channel with the ‘inappropriate’ content replaced and is freely available once more, so please, please, PLEASE watch this video all the way through, like and share it as much as possible.

Ignore the rubbish that is happening between popular vegan Youtubers at the moment and refocus on what is actually important: spreading the vegan message through education and positive action.

Thank you for reading, here is the video:

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Veganism – Top 10 ‘WTF’ Comments

As a vegan it can be an almost daily event to have an uninformed meat eater say the most inconsiderate and sometimes downright ridiculous things about veganism. Even though it can be frustrating and saddening to see how little people know about the impact of animal agriculture, taking a step back to look at their comments can be enlightening or even rather funny. People seem to make up facts on the spot or conjure up mad justifications without realising how silly they sound, and the results can often be spectacular and sometimes hilarious. I’ve collected 10 of my personal favourites here so you can have the last laugh, and I’m sure you may have heard some of them. If there are any more you think deserve a mention, then drop them in a comment below!

10 – “I tried going vegan once, there was literally nothing I could eat”

It genuinely surprises me that people do their weekly shopping as meat eaters and manage to navigate their way to the fruit and veg section of the shop easily enough. Yet as soon as they try going vegan, the fruit and veg section seems to mysteriously vanish from the face of the planet and all they feel they can eat is dry toast. I know that from an outside perspective it can seem that your choices become limited as a vegan, but the issue I think many people encounter is that instead of just trying new things, they desperately try to emulate their old diet with vegan alternatives. These products are getting better and more plentiful everyday, but they are still usually quite limited and I believe this is where the ‘expensive veganism’ myth comes from.

9 – “But I am against animal cruelty”

Now this one really makes me cringe. Just to stop myself losing all faith in humanity, I have to convince myself that the people who say this genuinely have never seen any picture showing the conditions in the animal agriculture industry. Either this or they fool themselves into thinking that their conscience can be cleared after eating a steak by sharing a petition about dog meat in some far off country.

8 – “Plants can feel pain too”

Pain is a response that is triggered by the brain when the nerve endings are affected. Without a brain, or for that matter a central nervous system, plants cannot feel the pain that sentient beings do. Of course plants respond to stimuli such as light, and no one can argue that they are not living things, but the fact still remains that plants do not have the components to actually feel a physical response such as pain. There are studies which I have not yet researched that are examining the possibility of sentience in botanical life, but the fact still remains; no brain, no pain.

7 – “You kill loads of tiny things when you walk”

That is almost certainly true, and it is unfortunate, but when I walk I am not systematically exploiting these tiny life forms for their ‘produce’. I haven’t raised a small patch of dirt with the sole intention of stamping on it’s tiny residents just for the purpose of enjoyment. If I could avoid killing anything then you can be sure that I would, but that’s the difference, humans have the choice not to kill or exploit animals, yet we continue to do so.

6 – “We’re animals”

Ironic or what? The very argument itself confirms their status alongside those they kill and exploit. At least some people have the delusion that they are in some way superior to animals (but that has its own set of issues that I don’t even want to begin tackling). We are animals, that is a fact, and to use this statement as a justification for animal agriculture is as brainless as it gets. Normally this is followed by something as tired and useless as “lions eat meat”… aaand what, are you suggesting you are a lion? Or even worse the somehow proud look guys have on their face when they compare themselves to outdated depictions of ‘cavemen’. These views are a twisted mess of power relations, social norms and objectifications akin to a stubborn ball of earphone wires that we vegans have the ‘pleasant’ job of untangling.

5 – “There’s not enough room on the planet to produce vegetables for everyone”

Whoa is it opposite day or something? The land requirement for a plant based diet is one third of the land needed to support meat and dairy. I’ve also heard several times that “rainforest destruction is the vegans’ fault, it’s all that soy they eat”… what are you smokin’ buddy, whatever it is it sounds pretty strong. The massive plantations of soy aren’t grown for vegans (we a eat quite a bit, but not THAT much), they are grown for western cattle consumption. If populations were controlled and the world lived on a vegan diet, today’s environmental issues would be a distant memory.

4 – “Yes but we’re putting the animals out of their misery”

Seriously. If I set someone on fire and then killed them, the whole thing would be fine “because I’m putting them out of their misery”? This is just absurd, I mean honestly do they not understand that there would be no misery without animal agriculture? The whole statement is a testament to the growing disassociation between consumer and producer that keeps an ignorant populace insensitive to the practices that put the meat on their table. The animals in question are subject to systems of classification decided by the dominant culture, which leads to discrimination towards certain species (otherwise known as ‘speciesism’). In other words, certain animals are put into groups that are labelled edible and inedible; for example eating a dog in the US is unthinkable because of this classification. Yet because pigs are classed as edible, their consumption is normalised and their treatment marginalised.

3 – “Vegans fart more, it’s disgusting”

This one really made me giggle, I mean it’s such a natural thing but it’s treated like a blasphemous outburst. As a matter of fact this gassiness is actually a sign of good gut health! You can inform your woefully ill informed meat-head that the reason we may fart a little more is simple:

There are 2 types of carbohydrates in the human diet; digestible and indigestible.  Digestible carbohydrates include starches and sucrose, whilst Indigestible carbohydrates include cellulose and other fibers. Vegans have an increased rate of plant fibre intake and rely heavily on pulses and beans which contain a unique chain of sugars called Oligosaccharides. The human digestive tract lacks the proper enzymes to break down these substances, allowing them to pass through the tract and provide health benefits such as improved mineral absorption, constipation prevention and more. These carbohydrates then stimulate the beneficial microflora that inhabits the human gut, which release gas; in short ‘happy tum = gassy bum’.

Diets rich in digestible and poor in indigestible carbohydrates have increased levels of glucose and fructose with the potential consequences of weight gain and excessive blood sugar absorption. These conditions can potentially lead to liver disease, type II diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and a weakened immune system. So yeah, not farting should be weird!

2 – “Hitler was a vegetarian”

This was a real WTF for me. I don’t even know in what universe this could be a logical statement. Not only is it disrespectful, but it’s also downright idiotic and lets be honest, ironic. It’s like they have ignored the whole point of veganism and assume it’s some fascist cult come to take away their rights, which are obviously more important than anything else. The fact that they can stand there after being informed of the truths of animal agriculture and say this with a big stupid grin on their face makes me question their sanity.

1 – “Mmm… Bacon”

Yes you knew it was going to be here somewhere, the big daddy of all vegan bashing comments. You may think that this phrase is excruciatingly frustrating, but just remember one thing; they have no arguments left. If you reach the point in the conversation where a meat eater uses this phrase, you can indulge in a smug little smile knowing full well that you have won the debate.

All of these points are examples of cognitive dissonance, which is the rejection of new information to preserve an already prevalent set of ideas. This is a psychological defence mechanism that is triggered when new information challenges a person’s beliefs or assumptions and causes a mental conflict. People must learn to overcome this hindrance in order to advance as logical and emotionally intelligent beings.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this list, it may expand as I hear more (for the sake of progress, let’s just hope this list doesn’t grow). If you are a vegan, I’m sure you’ve heard some of these before so hang in there, and if you are new to veganism… just brace yourself. If you aren’t vegan, I sincerely hope this guide has opened your eyes to some of the facts, and that you walk away a little wiser. If you would like more advice about becoming vegan then there will be lots of resources on this site for you to get started, as well as all over the interwebs (you can even contact me if you like). Thank you for reading!

If you do want more advice about veganism and ideas on how to live more sustainably then explore the site a little, I’m sure you’ll learn something new!

Don’t forget to share this page and subscribe to the website to receive updates for new content, you can also follow the Fox Eyed Man on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Tumblr for further discussions about environmentalism.

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